Prof. Dr. Yaw-chien Fang, Taiwan)

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Distinguished Prof. Dr. Yaw-chien Fang (born in 1958, Tainan, Taiwan) is a leading poet, writer, scholar, and editor in Taiwan. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in Taiwanese literature, National Cheng-kung University. Currently he is Distinguished Professor & Chair of Department of Taiwanese Languages & Literature, National Taichung University of Education, Taiwan. He has been the presidents, publishers, editors-inchief of several important associations and magazines. He has published 13 books of poetry, and more than 100 literary treatises & articles. His poetry mainly reflects love among human beings and between husband & wife, Taiwanese spirit and history, and a perspective of universal and human existence as well. His poetry has been translated into English, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, Turkish, Mongolian, Bengali, Telugu, Romanian, etc., and has had read in International Poetry Recitals in severals Countries around the world.

Pan-Tsi-Hue

 

 

In the nights in March

I mean to make you hear

Inside my body, the horn

Blowing out the heartfelt voice

Gentle but resolute

The golden will

Whirls by the wind

Though the head is falling onto the ground

The limbs are breaking apart

I shall not let any tears drop

From the deepest, deepest belly

Pain of voicelessness is practicing speaking out

Again and again

Again and again

I want to be named Pan-Tsi-Hue

My name is not Mu-bianhua

 

In the days in March

I mean to make you see

Inside my body, the true statue of me

Sitting on the throne

Dignified and sturdy

The golden will

Shines like the sun

Though the head is falling onto the ground

The limbs are breaking apart

I shall not let any tears drop

With weak fingers

Pain of namelessness is practicing writing the name

Again and again

Again and again

I want to be named Pan-Tsi-Hue

My name is not Mu-bianhua

Coming Back to Sakam

Coming to the gate of the Sakam Hall

The sea waves from more than three hundred years ago

Stand up and shout out on the inner sea shore of Taikang

Again and again, they bring out my old and fading memories

Open the long darkness

Borrow a slice of light

Piece together the broken fragments of my mother land

Originally it was a hill by the sea

At dawn hiding in the mist

At night drinking up the moonlight

Red-haired guys liked this lucky land

They built Fort Provintia on it

Koxinga’s army liked this lucky land too

They rebuilt it as Singthian capital

Qing military liked this lucky land too

They made it their own weapon storage

Xianfeng Emperor liked this lucky land too

They occupied it and built the Sea God Temple

Japanese army liked this lucky land too

They rebuilt it as their military hospital

Layer by layer the different bricks were

Layer by layer different dynasties

The mother land in the twentieth century, so post-modernistic

Sitting at the bottom of the valley three meters below, shouts painfully:

Where are the warriors of Sakam?

Where are the spirits of Sakam?

Never mention the word Sakam to avoid racial disunion!

Never mention the spirits of Sakam to avoid Sakamchauvinism!

Secretly, my tears drop on People Road

No Sakam people live in Sakam any more

Im the only Sakamese! I want to go into the SakamHall!

A Sakamese has to buy a ticket too.

Note

Sakam, originally named Provintia, built in 1653, is a first-class historical site of Taiwan, meaning eternity in Dutch. Provintia and Anping Fort were both built by the Dutch. They are the most famous historical sites in Taiwan. Provintia was a hill located by the eastern shore of Taikang inner sea facing Anping Fort on the western shore at a distance. It was the residential place of Sakamof the Siraya tribes.

Eager for the South Wind to Blow

 

Every day for a hundred years and more

The north wind has made me up and rouged me

They say I look more literate this way

    Japanese literature is my cream

    Chinese literature is my toner

    Western literature is my lotion

They are truly right.  My body has

Charming cosmetic fragrance of Japan, China and the West

 

The most charming one is Taipei

The kimono, cheongsam and the western dresses

Walking ruthlessly and peerlessly

We—though children of the land

In plain shirts, plain pants and plain coats

Shy of showing people                        

I always secretly

Ask myself

How the voice of the land for thousands of years

Has become silent

How the milky fragrance of mother tongue

Has changed taste for hundreds of years

 

The north wind

Shouts no more

I only look forward

To the south wind

Sleeping with me

Singing with me                      

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